I’LL SKIP THE BANTER ABOUT WHETHER BREAKFAST IS “IMPORTANT” AND ASSUME YOU’RE EATING IT DAILY. IF SO, BE SURE YOU’RE NOT MAKING THESE TWO MISTAKES!

When you wake up in the morning, this much is certain: It’s been hours since your last meal.

And since your last meal, protein turnover – the relationship between the rate at which your body builds and breaks down protein – has been in the red and your body has used up over 50 percent of the fuel stored in your liver. Both are no Bueno.

Plus, we already covered the fact that you begin the day lower on fuel than you ended yesterday – if you don’t refuel appropriately for the morning ahead, you’re in for a rough start. Stop making these two breakfast mistakes today!

MISTAKE #1: NOT EATING THE RIGHT AMOUNT OR TYPE OF PROTEIN

The cream cheese on your bagel doesn’t count.

Neither does the half-cup of almond milk you used in your cereal.

Protein plays a plethora of roles in your body. Most notably, it “turns on” muscle building at the cellular level. When you eat a protein-rich meal, it brings protein turnover out of the red and into the green because for the next few hours – assuming you ate the right time and right amount – your body is building more protein than it is breaking down. The more you can trigger a positive change in protein turnover throughout the day the more the odds will be in your favor for building muscle.

But eating enough protein is important for more than just muscle building. Some of its many other necessary roles include:

  • Protein serves as an essential structural component for cells in your body
  • Protein fights off germs and foreign invaders serving as immune system cells
  • Proteins comprise hormones and enzymes
  • Proteins comprise white and red blood cells and antibodies

And of course, as I break down in further detail in my free eBook, “Eat More Protein To Lose More Weight,” it has a significant impact on your appetite, too. So, when you opt for a granola bar instead of a protein bar…

a bagel in place of an omelet…

or a cup of orange juice over a protein shake…

you’re doing yourself a disservice.

What to Eat: All animal-based products are excellent sources of high-quality protein. Don’t limit yourself to traditional “breakfast” foods in the morning or you may grow tired of eggs quickly. Sure, eggs, whites, Greek yogurt, and milk are excellent breakfast proteins, but never hesitate to include chicken, beef, pork, or fish either. Last night’s dinner may taste twice as good the next morning!

How Much to Eat: Aim for 25 – 35 grams of protein. Your protein selection should come from high-quality, complete proteins. You can learn the difference between complete and incomplete proteins by watching this short video.

MISTAKE #2: CHOOSING LOW-FIBER CARBOHYDRATES

Fiber is an indigestible starch that has a profound impact on your health, energy, and appetite. For the sake of building a better breakfast, you need to know that it slows down digestion. And this slowed digestion has a positive impact on blood glucose and insulin levels, as well as digestion.

Translation: It keeps energy levels steady and your appetite in check for the next several hours.

A food low in fiber sends you on a ride aboard the energy roller coaster: you’ll hit a new high and low in blood glucose in insulin levels in a short period, only to be left feeling fatigued and hungry soon after.

So, I guess that takes toaster strudels, white bread and butter, a glass of orange juice, and most granola bars off the table, huh?

What to Eat: Oats, whole-grain cereals, breads, wraps, and bagels, as well as fruits and vegetables are all high-fiber options to consider starting your day with. A bowl of oatmeal topped with a dollop of Greek yogurt and handful of berries is the perfect pairing to your morning omelet.